Diary of Unknown Symptoms

Mystery of the Internal Vibration

Entry for May 21, 2007

Three days of Brazil nuts and I can notice the difference. It’s very subtle but the first thing I noticed was my skin. I can’t really explain it but it feels “tougher” and stronger. Then I noticed my hair starting to grow. Another thing I’ve noticed was the candida. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, but I can feel it slowly going away too.

Selenium deficiencies limit cellular immunity against yeast.

Phagocytes (cells active in cell-mediated immunity) require selenium for the enzyme glutathione peroxidase function. Peroxidase activity in phagocytes is higher than in most other tissues (approximately twice that in red blood cells), and this is reflected in a higher need for selenium. The glutathione peroxidase system is an antioxidant enzyme system and is especially critical for phagocytic cell function. It has been experimentally demonstrated that selenium deficiency selectively causes a predisposition to yeast infection

All the supplements I’ve tried for candida and the one thing that works is Brazil nuts. Where did I read that? Nowhere. I was googling selenium and a site said that they contained the highest concentration and because they are so high in Selenium, I only eat three – four a day. That’s it and it’s natural.

The vibration comes and goes but for the most part, I’m not vibrating anymore.

This is the road to recovery. The beginning of the end? God I hope so. It’s only taken me two years to figure this all out. Or have I?

May 21, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 20, 2007

Brazil nuts’ selenium storing secrets revealed?

19 October 2006

Brazil nuts are a rich source of selenium, an essential trace element, and now scientists have identified 15 selenium-containing peptides in the tasty treats.

The discovery should help them to understand why Brazil nuts are so good at accumulating selenium.

Selenium is believed to offer protection against heart disease and to help prevent cancer particularly of the prostrate. It is also a powerful antioxidant – meaning that it can protect cells from free radical damage. Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium containing about 2500 times as much as any other nut.

The selenium peptides were by identified by Ryszard Lobinski and colleagues from the University of Pau and the Adour, France, who have detected, fragmented and sequenced 15 new selenium peptides from Brazil nuts.

Lobinski started by breaking down the Brazil nut proteins using the digestive enzyme trypsin. He then used two stages of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ICP (inductively coupled plasma) mass spectrometry (MS) to purify and concentrate the selenium-containing compounds.

In the next step, the researchers used two mass spectrometry techniques in parallel. The first – based on ICP – allowed the researchers to work out how long it took the peptide to pass through a chromatography column. Using this information, the team then used a second technique – electrospray ionisation – to pick out characteristic selenium isotope patterns of the peptides. They could then fragment and sequence these peptides to identify them.

Sam Houk from the Iowa State University, Ames, US, said, ‘this is an excellent example of the value of element-specific information from ICP-MS combined with molecular information from ESI-MS in studies of proteins or peptides with heteroatoms. Neither technique alone could identify these seleno proteins.’

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 20, 2007

Brazil nuts: an effective way to improve selenium status

From the Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Background: Brazil nuts provide a rich natural source of selenium, yet no studies have investigated the bioavailability of selenium in humans.

Objective: We investigated the efficacy of Brazil nuts in increasing selenium status in comparison with selenomethionine.

Design: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 59 New Zealand adults. Participants consumed 2 Brazil nuts thought to provide 100 µg Se, 100 µg Se as selenomethionine, or placebo daily for 12 wk. Actual intake from nuts averaged 53 µg Se/d (possible range: 20–84 µg Se). Plasma selenium and plasma and whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 wk, and effects of treatments were compared.

Results: Plasma selenium increased by 64.2%, 61.0%, and 7.6%; plasma GPx by 8.3%, 3.4%, and –1.2%; and whole blood GPx by 13.2%, 5.3%, and 1.9% in the Brazil nut, selenomethionine, and placebo groups, respectively. Change over time at 12 wk in plasma selenium (P < 0.0001 for both groups) and plasma GPx activity in the Brazil nut (P < 0.001) and selenomethionine (P = 0.014) groups differed significantly from the placebo group but not from each other. The change in whole blood GPx activity was greater in the Brazil nut group than in the placebo (P = 0.002) and selenomethionine (P = 0.032) groups.

Conclusion: Consumption of 2 Brazil nuts daily is as effective for increasing selenium status and enhancing GPx activity as 100 µg Se as selenomethionine. Inclusion of this high-selenium food in the diet could avoid the need for fortification or supplements to improve selenium status.

May 20, 2007 Posted by | Health | , | Leave a comment

Entry for May 18, 2007

I’ve been taking a high dosage of zinc since the end of February and although I’ve found great success, I’m still waiting patiently for more results. Maybe it’s time to look at something else?

I still have candida but it has improved since taking zinc. My knees are still very weak, my adrenals are stressed and I suspect my thyroid is effected. I keep checking my head for the hair loss but the effects from the zinc seem to have stopped. Back to Doctor Google and I come across a reference to hair loss.

Zinc and Selenium for better Hair Loss Treatment

The root of many hair loss problems is due to mineral and vitamin deficiency as clearly pointed out by Elizabeth Wotton, N.D. who is a naturopathic doctor at Compass Family Health Center in Plymouth, Massachusetts.She recommends that in order to remedy this situation ,it is of utmost importance to correct such deficiency by absorbing the proper vitamins and minerals and also if necessary to correct any improper indigestion problem In fact ,there are two minerals that are responsible for possible loss of hair, namely selenium and zinc.

A deficiency of both these minerals can ,eventually,affect the healthy growth of your hair, as both these minerals, as observed by researchers,aid in the in the utilization of protein that your body needs to help produce hair.

Your skin and scalp will thus become more supple and elastic and dandruff will be under control thanks to its anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties. As a result of which, your hair will develop and grow normally. Zinc on the other hand is required for the maintenance of normal connective tissue structures and also for the synthesis of normal collagen. As with Selenium, Zinc may promote healthy hair growth and slow hair loss.

We can conclude that deficiencies in selenium and zinc can contribute to hair loss.It is one of the main cause of baldness in people.Knowing the cause of your hair loss is very important to determine the nature of treatment best for you.

I’ve taken Selenium now and again in the past but maybe it’s time to look at the other things that are effected by a Selenium deficiency. Selenium is linked with hair loss, candida, thyroid function and joint pain.

Selenium deficiencies limit cellular immunity against yeast.

Phagocytes (cells active in cell-mediated immunity) require selenium for the enzyme glutathione peroxidase function. Peroxidase activity in phagocytes is higher than in most other tissues (approximately twice that in red blood cells), and this is reflected in a higher need for selenium. The glutathione peroxidase system is an antioxidant enzyme system and is especially critical for phagocytic cell function. It has been experimentally demonstrated that selenium deficiency selectively causes a predisposition to yeast infection.

Support of the thyroid gland

In addition to iodine, selenium is a critical mineral for maintaining proper function of the thyroid gland. In order for the thyroid to produce the most active form of its hormone (a version of thyroid hormone that is called T3), selenium is not only essential, but also helps regulate the amount of hormone that is produced.

Joint Pain

Joints benefit from an adequate intake of selenium. Mucopolysaccharides need selenium to be produced. These molecules lubricate joints and keep them working longer. Without lubrication, the bones in your joints would grind on each other and possibly cause rheumatoid arthritis.

Brazil Nuts

Brazil nuts are one of the most concentrated food sources of selenium, featuring about 70-90 micrograms per nut. Brazil nuts may contain as much as 544 micrograms of selenium per ounce. It is wise to eat Brazil nuts only occasionally because of their unusually high intake of selenium.

Although supplemental selenium by itself has not been shown to cause improvement in RA, selenium taken together with vitamin E appears to have measurable positive results.

Supplements

With regard to dietary supplements, there is some evidence that vitamin C inactivates selenium within the digestive tract. Persons who are concerned about their selenium intake may prefer to take supplemental selenium in the absence of vitamin C.

Some naturopaths recommend taking selenium together with vitamin E on the grounds that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects.

All this is very interesting. I’ve taken Selenium without any effect in the past and now I find out that vitamin C inactivates selenium within the digestive tract. Since I’ve been taking vitamin C everyday in dosages ranging from 500-2500 mg. Could that be why I had no progress in the past?

I’ll try taking selenium again but this time, I’ll eat a few Brazil nuts a day and I pick some up on my lunch hour.

May 18, 2007 Posted by | Health | , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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